The adventures of a fourth grade teacher in East Central Illinois.

The Power of Silence

Teachers talk. A lot. Surprisingly, there are no classes in university programs that prepare prospective teachers for this. I never had a single class on how to develop and use my “teacher voice.” But I don’t think anyone goes into the education profession expecting to spend their time in quiet rooms with limited talking. Maybe it is from our own experiences that we just know that it is part of the job.

I love talking to my students but, more importantly, I love talking with my students. They have such great ideas, unique experiences, and clever wit. We can talk about life and learning and hobbies and interests and we can go from making jokes to identifying deep thoughts within a few minutes. Maybe this is why my main teaching style is discussion. I lead discussions often, whether for mathing or reading or inquiry. I believe it gives students an opportunity to express their own ideas and take risks when they do so.

Teachers also talk when they are guiding students in their behaviour. I make a point to praise positive behaviour, to acknowledge it when I see it. But I also use my voice to correct inappropriate behaviour. I try to do so with as little fanfare as possible. One of my favourite phrases to describe correcting student behaviour is to use a “matter of fact voice.” Yes, there are times when I need to increase my volume simply to be heard over the regular noise of the classroom, but I try to make sure I am not speaking out of anger.

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However, there are definitely times when it is time to stop talking. When the noise of students gets too loud, it can be tempting to raise my voice to be louder. I have learned, though, that silence can speak much more clearly than volume can. Silence will get students’ attention more effectively that shouting, yelling, or screaming ever will.

Today I had one of those moments. As we approached the end of the day, I realised several of my students were getting off track and were losing their focus. It came to a head when I released students to work with partners on a math problem and chaos broke out. I immediately signaled my class with my chimes, sent them to their seats, and then waited in silence. It took a long time, much longer than I would have wished, but it was necessary. Once the entire class was refocused, I was able to speak softly and lead a discussion of what students were supposed to be doing, what had been happening, and how we could fix it moving forward. We will continue this conversation tomorrow morning, setting a goal as a class for improved behaviour that will create a better, safer, learning environment.

How do you harness the power of silence in your life?

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