The adventures of a fourth grade teacher in East Central Illinois.

Archive for March, 2018

Lessons from a Children’s Basketball Game

Those who know me well know that athleticism is not my strong suit. Sure, I like riding my bike and, when the weather cooperates, cheerfully bike the 5-6 miles from my house to work and back. And yes, I love camping and hiking through the woods. But beyond that? Nope. I don’t play basketball, soccer, rugby, football, volleyball, hockey, baseball, tennis, lacrosse. Nor do I compete in track and field events, figure skating, swimming, running, or competitive cycling. Now, this can be chalked up to several reasons: I am blind in one eye, so I don’t have any depth perception; I likely have exercise-induced asthma, so running is generally a bad idea; no one in my family participated in athletics when I was growing up; very few of my friends cared much about participating in sports; I enjoy being a spectator.

This last bit is an important point, though! Even though I myself do not participate in sports, I actually really enjoy watching others play, compete, perform, etc. This was true in high school, when I was in the pep band and performed for nearly every football and basketball game. This was true when my baby sister was on a soccer team and I went to her games. And this has been true for the seven years I have been teaching fourth grade and asking my students to let me know about any games or performances so I can go and cheer them on.

A few weeks ago, two of my students invited me to come to their basketball games on Saturday mornings. I gladly accepted the invitation. While watching them play, I was reminded of a few lessons you can learn from being on a competitive team and wanted to write them down, both for myself and for those who may be reading:

Cooperation: Watching my students play on a team, I saw many examples of cooperation. Particularly as they were playing basketball, I watched as they got the ball, passed it to others, and worked together to achieve their objectives. What was especially interesting to witness was when those on the other team did not cooperate and took wild shots instead of passing the ball to another. Cooperation is that constant trait of working together for the glory of all, not the glory of one.

Compassion: My students won both of the games I watched. In fact, they dominated. But they showed compassion and kindness to the other teams. There was no gloating or mockery. When someone fell down, one of my boys was the first to run over and help him up and help him across the court.

Focus: There are so many voices yelling at the boys playing on the court. I was impressed as I watched my students focus on listening to their coaches and ignoring all of the other noise bombarding them. I noticed another boy who listened to what everyone was saying and, as a result, he was frequently confused and made poor decisions.

Joy: This may be the one thing that I saw most exuberantly. I am fully aware of the reality that not everything I have my students do in the classroom brings joy to them. As much as I love all of the subjects I teach (and I really do!), I know that my students do not always share that love, that joy. But I have burned in my memory the image of my students’ smiles of pure joy when they saw me walk into the gymnasium to watch them play. That joy lasted throughout the game.

As Spring Break wraps up and we return to the classroom on Monday, I hope to bring these lessons from the court to the classroom. I plan on using the examples I saw as I teach my students to cooperate, to show compassion, to focus on what’s important, and to find joy in the things they do. Many teachers throughout the country have adopted the Hour of Code; maybe it is time to institute the Hour of Joy, where students are given the freedom to explore whatever it is that brings them the most joy and to share that joy with others.

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March Madness Celebration

I feel very fortunate to work in a school that has classroom parties because I know that it is a tradition that has been vanishing in many parts of the state and in the country. Our awesome Wiley PTA assists us in planning and organising these parties, which are usually done three times each year: once in the fall, when we have a Halloween party; once in December, when we have our Winter holiday parties (recognising that we have students of many faith traditions, we don’t have just a Christmas party), and a Valentine’s Day party. Now, I love parties and I love holidays. But there is one party that I dread each year: the Valentine’s Day party. It usually ends up being lots of cupcakes, lots of sugar, and lots of drama. And so when my fourth grade partner this year, Mrs. B, suggested we abandon the Valentine’s Day party and have a March Madness celebration right before Spring Break instead, I was fully committed to making it happen.

When February came around, even though we had told students and families that we were not going to have a party, there was still some disappointment that we weren’t having a party when everyone else was. (Never mind that my class got to watch a movie that afternoon, instead.) But by the end of the day yesterday, when we had our celebration, I don’t think anyone was wishing we had had a party in February instead!

The March Madness celebration had four components that we turned into stations that the students rotated through: party food in Mrs. B’s room, where students had pizza, chicken wings, egg rolls, macaroni and cheese, chips, salsa, cookies, soda, ice cream, and more; filling out brackets in my room, where students learned about the NCAA tournament brackets and then filled out their own; NCAA tournament history in the Library, where students read a short passage about the tournament and watched highlights videos; and basketball outside with the P.E. teacher.

I can honestly say that this was the most successful party I have had in my seven years at Wiley. The students had fun, the teachers had fun, the parents had fun, and every learned something while doing it!

Huge shout-out to Mrs. B for the idea, the planning, and the implementation of something that I hope will become a new tradition for the intermediate students in my building! So many people were asking if we were going to do this again next year; my answer was the same every time: That’s the plan!